The Shelley-Godwin ArchiveBitCuratorO Say Can You SeeTransforming the Afro-Caribbean World

The Shelley-Godwin Archive

A digital resource comprising works of Mary Wollstonecraft, William Godwin, Percy Bysshe Shelley and Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley. These manuscripts and early editions will be made freely available to the public through an innovative framework constituting a new model of best practice for research libraries. More

BitCurator

The BitCurator project, a joint effort led by the School of Information and Library Science at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (SILS) and the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH), will build, test, and analyze systems and software for incorporating digital forensics methods into the workflows of a variety of collecting institutions. More

O Say Can You See

“O Say Can You See”: the Early Washington, D.C. Law and Family Project explores multi-generational black and white family networks in early Washington, D.C., by collecting, digitizing, making accessible, and analyzing over 4,000 case files from the D.C. court from 1808 to 1815, records of Md. courts, and related documents about these families. More

Transforming the Afro-Caribbean World

University of Maryland's Center for the History of the New America (CHNA) has partnered with MITH to bring together scholars of the Panama Canal, Afro-Caribbean history, and experts in the digital humanities, data modeling, and visualization for a two-day planning workshop that will discuss a large-scale effort to explore Afro-Caribbean labor, migration, and the Panama Canal. More
More Projects

MITH partners in $1.25 Million Mellon Grant Awarded to UMD’s Arts and Humanities College

A $1.25 million grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation will fund research, education and training at the intersections of digital humanities and African American studies at the University of Maryland. The grant will help to prepare a diverse community of scholars and students whose work will both broaden the reach of the digital humanities in African American history and cultural studies and enrich humanities research with new methods, archives and tools. . . . Continue Reading


Hacking MITH’s Legacy Web Servers: A Holistic Approach to Preservation on the Web

Editor’s note— This is the second post in MITH’s summer series on stewarding digital humanities scholarship. For more background, see the previous post.

In September of 2012 MITH moved from its long-time home in the basement of the McKeldin Library on the University of Maryland campus to a newly renovated, and considerably better lit, location next to Library Media Services in the Hornbake Library. . . . Continue Reading


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