The Shelley-Godwin ArchiveBitCuratorO Say Can You SeeTransforming the Afro-Caribbean World

The Shelley-Godwin Archive

A digital resource comprising works of Mary Wollstonecraft, William Godwin, Percy Bysshe Shelley and Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley. These manuscripts and early editions will be made freely available to the public through an innovative framework constituting a new model of best practice for research libraries. More

BitCurator

The BitCurator project, a joint effort led by the School of Information and Library Science at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (SILS) and the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH), will build, test, and analyze systems and software for incorporating digital forensics methods into the workflows of a variety of collecting institutions. More

O Say Can You See

“O Say Can You See”: the Early Washington, D.C. Law and Family Project explores multi-generational black and white family networks in early Washington, D.C., by collecting, digitizing, making accessible, and analyzing over 4,000 case files from the D.C. court from 1808 to 1815, records of Md. courts, and related documents about these families. More

Transforming the Afro-Caribbean World

University of Maryland's Center for the History of the New America (CHNA) has partnered with MITH to bring together scholars of the Panama Canal, Afro-Caribbean history, and experts in the digital humanities, data modeling, and visualization for a two-day planning workshop that will discuss a large-scale effort to explore Afro-Caribbean labor, migration, and the Panama Canal. More
More Projects

Darius Kazemi: Strange Bedfellows: Digital Humanities, Internet Art, and the Weird Internet

Darius Kazemi, Independent Artist@tinysubversions
MITH Conference RoomTuesday, November 4, 201412:30 pm

Kazemi will discuss the “Weird Internet,” a wildly popular creative internet-native subculture, and its intersections with Digital Humanities and Internet Art (in the fine arts tradition).

The Big Data approach to analysis of texts is painfully limited in the knowledge it can produce. This talk will take Bruno Latour’s Compositionist Manifesto as well as the speaker’s personal history as a professional “online metrics” analyst as a jumping off point. . . . Continue Reading


Podcasts for MITH Digital Dialogues: Now with captions!

In an attempt to make our Digital Dialogues podcast videos more accessible, MITH has begun to add captions to the videos on our Vimeo site.  All previous podcast videos prior to the current season currently have captions, and as we move into the Fall 2014 season we will be adding them as we get them back from our vendor, Amara. . . . Continue Reading


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