The Shelley-Godwin ArchiveBitCuratorO Say Can You SeeTransforming the Afro-Caribbean World

The Shelley-Godwin Archive

A digital resource comprising works of Mary Wollstonecraft, William Godwin, Percy Bysshe Shelley and Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley. These manuscripts and early editions will be made freely available to the public through an innovative framework constituting a new model of best practice for research libraries. More

BitCurator

The BitCurator project, a joint effort led by the School of Information and Library Science at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (SILS) and the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH), will build, test, and analyze systems and software for incorporating digital forensics methods into the workflows of a variety of collecting institutions. More

O Say Can You See

“O Say Can You See”: the Early Washington, D.C. Law and Family Project explores multi-generational black and white family networks in early Washington, D.C., by collecting, digitizing, making accessible, and analyzing over 4,000 case files from the D.C. court from 1808 to 1815, records of Md. courts, and related documents about these families. More

Transforming the Afro-Caribbean World

University of Maryland's Center for the History of the New America (CHNA) has partnered with MITH to bring together scholars of the Panama Canal, Afro-Caribbean history, and experts in the digital humanities, data modeling, and visualization for a two-day planning workshop that will discuss a large-scale effort to explore Afro-Caribbean labor, migration, and the Panama Canal. More
UMD_MITH

MITH’s Ed Summers discusses his Ferguson Twitter archive: wp.me/p2uWXT-3uS @edsu #Ferguson

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MITH’s Ed Summers discusses his Ferguson Twitter archive

Cross-posted and edited from a blog entry on medium.com: On Forgetting and hydration.

After writing about the Ferguson Twitter archive a few months ago, I received requests from three people both outside and within University of Maryland, for access to the data. My response to the external academic researchers was to point them to Twitter’s Terms of Service which says:

If you provide Content to third parties, including downloadable datasets of Content or an API that returns Content, you will only distribute or allow download of Tweet IDs and/or User IDs. . . . Continue Reading


Music Addressability API

The Enhancing Music Notation Addressability project (EMA) is creating a system to address specific parts of a music document available online. By addressing we mean being able to talk about a specific music passage (cfr. Michael Witmore’s blog post on textual addressability).

On paper, something equivalent could be done by circling or highlighting a part of a score. . . . Continue Reading


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