The Shelley-Godwin ArchiveBitCuratorO Say Can You SeeTransforming the Afro-Caribbean World

The Shelley-Godwin Archive

A digital resource comprising works of Mary Wollstonecraft, William Godwin, Percy Bysshe Shelley and Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley. These manuscripts and early editions will be made freely available to the public through an innovative framework constituting a new model of best practice for research libraries. More

BitCurator

The BitCurator project, a joint effort led by the School of Information and Library Science at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (SILS) and the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH), will build, test, and analyze systems and software for incorporating digital forensics methods into the workflows of a variety of collecting institutions. More

O Say Can You See

“O Say Can You See”: the Early Washington, D.C. Law and Family Project explores multi-generational black and white family networks in early Washington, D.C., by collecting, digitizing, making accessible, and analyzing over 4,000 case files from the D.C. court from 1808 to 1815, records of Md. courts, and related documents about these families. More

Transforming the Afro-Caribbean World

University of Maryland's Center for the History of the New America (CHNA) has partnered with MITH to bring together scholars of the Panama Canal, Afro-Caribbean history, and experts in the digital humanities, data modeling, and visualization for a two-day planning workshop that will discuss a large-scale effort to explore Afro-Caribbean labor, migration, and the Panama Canal. More
UMD_MITH

Books on the Digital Humanities available through UMD Libraries! wp.me/p2uWXT-3tS

More Projects

Andrew Johnston: Models of Code and the Digital Architecture of Time

Andrew Johnston, Assistant Professor of EnglishNorth Carolina State University @a_johnston
MITH Conference RoomTuesday, October 28, 201412:30 pm

Andrew Johnston will discuss a portion of his forthcoming book, Pulses of Abstraction: Episodes from a History of Animation, which traces the emergence of real-time computer graphics and animation in the 1970s. Focusing especially on a programming language developed through funding from the National Science Foundation and that language’s use at the art and engineering collective called the Circle Graphics Habitat at the University of Illinois, Chicago, this presentation provides an archaeology of how time and models of perception are coded within early digital graphics systems. . . . Continue Reading


Books on the Digital Humanities available through UMD Libraries!

As part of the ongoing collaboration between the University of Maryland Libraries and MITH, the Libraries have allocated a portion of collections funds to expand the number of books related to the digital humanities available to our community. Kelsey Corlett-Rivera, Librarian for the School of Languages, Literatures, and Culture, has served as liaison to MITH and has worked with our staff to develop and build these collections, which have grown by almost 50 titles over the last two years. . . . Continue Reading


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