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10 Feb 2012

Narratives That Heal

By | 2017-02-05T21:25:39+00:00 Fri, Feb 10, 2012|

This was a 2002 Faculty Fellowship project of Professor Carolina Robertson from the Ethnomusicology Department. Based on the core premise that creativity is not necessarily a state of grace rooted in innate talent or skill, a series of seminars were offered through the University's 'Teachers as Scholars' program, in which teacher participants explored their own life narratives as doorways to creativity against a backdrop of parallel stories from other cultures. Dr. Robertson worked with a MITH programmer to develop an interactive website with malleable texts, sounds and images as the dynamic outcome of this process.

10 Feb 2012

Multilingual Thesaurus for Medieval Studies

By | 2017-02-05T21:25:39+00:00 Fri, Feb 10, 2012|

The Multilingual Thesaurus for Medieval Studies (MLTMS) links terms, i.e. word-forms, with the same meaning, i.e. concept, in the core languages of contemporary studies of the Middle Ages. MLTMS enables scholars to search a variety of electronic resources in different languages at a conceptual level whilst being based on both common and technical word-forms in the major languages used by scholars and other interested parties. Cross-language retrieval of search-results is therefore possible from a number of query-languages. MLTMS is an open source reference tool available to producers of reference works in medieval studies, both large and small.

10 Feb 2012

MONK: Humanities Text Mining in the Digital Library

By | 2016-01-21T20:27:39+00:00 Fri, Feb 10, 2012|

MONK stands for Metadata Offer New Knowledge, and was a digital environment designed to help humanities scholars discover and analyze patterns in the texts they study. It supported both micro analyses of the verbal texture of an individual text and macro analyses that let you locate texts in the context of a large document space consisting of hundreds or thousands of other texts.

10 Feb 2012

Mapping the Missions: The Jesuit-Guaraní Republic, 1754-2000

By | 2017-02-05T21:25:39+00:00 Fri, Feb 10, 2012|

Daryle Williams, Associate Professor of History, worked with MITH on an interactive digital historical atlas of the Jesuit-Guaraní missions (located in the Paraná-Uruguay watershed, along the borders of Argentina, Brazil, and Paraguay). Making use of text encoding, image mapping, and interactive media technology, the atlas explores the missions' evolution from remote colonial-era missionary settlements to UNESCO World Heritage sites. A parallel objective is the integration of textual and visual sources in humanistic scholarship.

10 Feb 2012

Flare Productions

By | 2017-02-05T21:25:40+00:00 Fri, Feb 10, 2012|

Flare Productions is a not-for-profit filmmaking organization. Professor John Fuegi (with partner Jo Francis), completed a 2001 MITH Faculty Fellowship for which they produced a film as part of the Women of Power series of films, a series of thirteen films which showcase the accomplishments of women over the last 150 years. They completed one film in the series, entitled They Dreamed Tomorrow, chronicling the contributions of Ada, Countess Lovelace (1815-1852), Lord Byron’s daughter, and Charles Babbage (1791-1871) to the early history of computing. Fuegi and Francis also produced a website and DVD to complement the film.

9 Feb 2012

Hughes@100

By | 2017-11-21T13:52:10+00:00 Thu, Feb 9, 2012|

These two MITH-sponsored events were held in celebration of the 100th anniversary of the birth of one of America's great literary forces, the poet Langston Hughes. The first event was a Poetry Slam produced in collaboration with Border's Books & Music, the David C. Driskell Center for the Study of the African Diaspora, the Clarice Smith Center and the Committee on Africa and the Americas. The second event, Langston's First Book of Jazz, was a collaboration with the Smithsonian Institution’s America’s Jazz Heritage Program (A Partnership of the Lila-Wallace Readers Digest Fund), and the Program in African American Culture of the National Museum of History. It was held on February 25, 2002 in Carmichael Hall at the National Museum of American History.

9 Feb 2012

Feminism and Writing Technologies

By | 2015-12-18T20:05:00+00:00 Thu, Feb 9, 2012|

King’s Feminism and Writing Technologies was an early MITH Faculty Fellow project which featured a virtual 17th-century Quaker women’s printshop designed to plumb more fully (by reconfiguring objects of study) the intertwinings of print and digital distributions of knowledge production and their implications for research in the twenty-first century university.

9 Feb 2012

Emily Dickinson: Technology and Mythobiography

By | 2017-02-05T21:25:40+00:00 Thu, Feb 9, 2012|

This was a 2001 Faculty Fellowship project of Professor Carol Burbank from the Department of Theatre. Employing two different models of performative technology, a series of interactive templates for student experiments in writing, and a web collage or performance “fugue,” Dr. Burbank explored the way pastiche and narrative function within a technological frame.

9 Feb 2012

Business Russian Case Studies

By | 2017-02-05T21:25:41+00:00 Thu, Feb 9, 2012|

This web-based language learning project was developed by 2001 MITH Faculty Fellow, Professor Maria Lekic from Asian and East European Languages and Cultures. The project involved the teaching and analysis of adult foreign language acquisition within relatively unscripted naturalistic settings through the design of computerized modules for individual or classroom involving specialized vocabularies (such as Russian for business use, space science, etc.).

9 Feb 2012

Born-Digital Literary Materials

By | 2017-02-05T21:25:41+00:00 Thu, Feb 9, 2012|

This project consisted of a series of site visits and planning meetings among personnel working with the born-digital components of three significant collections of literary material: the Salman Rushdie papers at Emory University's Woodruff Library, the Michael Joyce Papers at the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center at the University of Texas at Austin, and the Deena Larsen Collection at the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH) at the University of Maryland.