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14 Mar 2017

Avery Dame Digital Dialogue

By |2017-04-06T12:54:41+00:00Mar 14, 2017|Uncategorized|

Digitization and online access are often presented as an important tool for making history, particularly those whose histories are rarely told, accessible to a [...]

13 Mar 2017

The Transgender Usenet Archive

By |2017-07-10T11:23:56+00:00Mar 13, 2017|

2016-17 Winnemore Digital Dissertation Fellow Avery Dame spent his fellowship year building the Transgender Usenet Archive, a public archive of posts from five targeted Usenet newsgroups which grew in popularity during the 1990’s upswing in online discussion forums, in this case around groups which were central to the development of a transgender community.

27 Feb 2017

Citations: The Renaissance Imitation Mass (CRIM)

By |2017-03-27T13:21:45+00:00Feb 27, 2017|

Citations: The Renaissance Imitation Mass (CRIM) will extend the idea of the quotable text for music in an innovative and open way. The focal point of our inquiry is the so-called “imitation” Mass, a Renaissance musical genre notable for the ways in which its composers derived new, large-scale works from pre-existing ones.

12 Oct 2016

Gregory Zinman Digital Dialogue

By |2017-05-12T14:48:25+00:00Oct 12, 2016|Uncategorized|

This talk describes the discovery and significance of Etude (1967), a previously unknown work by media artist Nam June Paik identified by the author in the Smithsonian American [...]

29 Jan 2016

African American History, Culture and Digital Humanities

By |2018-03-05T15:01:16+00:00Jan 29, 2016|

African American History, Culture and Digital Humanities (AADHum) was awarded to the College of Arts and Humanities (ARHU) and is being co-directed by MITH and the Arts and Humanities Center for Synergy (Center for Synergy). The project was funded by a $1.25 million grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation for research, education and training at the intersections of digital humanities and African American studies, and will help to prepare a diverse community of scholars and students whose work will both broaden the reach of the digital humanities in African American history and cultural studies, and enrich humanities research with new methods, archives and tools.