Film and Media Studies

Home > Media Studies > Film and Media Studies
4 Apr 2017

Josh Shepperd Digital Dialogue

By | 2017-04-17T10:53:15+00:00 Tue, Apr 4, 2017|Uncategorized|

At a moment when public media is facing the threat of elimination from lawmakers, this presentation examines the organizational contributions made by noncommercial media research to U.S. informational history. Taking an institutional approach, this presentation looks at the infrastructural origins of public media in archival distribution practices after WWII. In 1948 educational broadcasters were

12 Oct 2016

Gregory Zinman Digital Dialogue

By | 2017-02-05T21:24:51+00:00 Wed, Oct 12, 2016|Uncategorized|

This talk describes the discovery and significance of Etude (1967), a previously unknown work by media artist Nam June Paik identified by the author in the Smithsonian American Art Museum’s recently-acquired Paik archive. Composed at Bell Labs, in collaboration with engineers, and written in an early version of FORTRAN, Etude stands as one of the earliest works of digital art—although it

1 Sep 2015

Elizabeth Losh Digital Dialogue

By | 2017-02-06T10:47:22+00:00 Tue, Sep 1, 2015|Dialogue, Digital Dialogues, Events|

The study of computational media still has far to go when it comes to contradicting the solo white male inventor myths that are often reified in mainstream culture, although recent work in media archaeology that emphasizes the manual labor of participants with the apparatus is changing the narrative about the rise of software culture. It

4 Jun 2015

‘Mined to Death’ Documentary Film

By | 2015-12-19T01:33:44+00:00 Thu, Jun 4, 2015|

The documentary was a project of 2003-04 MITH Fellow Regina Harrison. It depicts miners in Potosi, Bolivia, who extract silver, zinc, and lead from the mountain in the same precarious conditions as their ancestors did five centuries ago. Tourist agencies and transnational mining companies promise to bring in additional revenue for the miners, but it is apparent that the ‘rich’ mountain is dying.

3 Jun 2015

Just a Click Away From Home: Ecuadorian Migration, Nostalgia, and Technology in Transnational Times

By | 2015-12-19T01:06:46+00:00 Wed, Jun 3, 2015|

Silvia Mejia was a Clara and Robert Vambery Distinguished Graduate Fellow and MITH Graduate Fellow during academic years 2004-05 and 2005-06. Working from within the Comparative Literature program with John Fuegi, and with MITH Director Martha Nell Smith, Mejia focused on three different narrations of migration from Ecuador to the United States, Spain and Italy. The resulting documentary video and its study guide explored how new technologies such as the Internet, satellite communications, email, videoconferences, and cell phones have changed the experience of displacement.

10 Feb 2012

Flare Productions

By | 2017-02-05T21:25:40+00:00 Fri, Feb 10, 2012|

Flare Productions is a not-for-profit filmmaking organization. Professor John Fuegi (with partner Jo Francis), completed a 2001 MITH Faculty Fellowship for which they produced a film as part of the Women of Power series of films, a series of thirteen films which showcase the accomplishments of women over the last 150 years. They completed one film in the series, entitled They Dreamed Tomorrow, chronicling the contributions of Ada, Countess Lovelace (1815-1852), Lord Byron’s daughter, and Charles Babbage (1791-1871) to the early history of computing. Fuegi and Francis also produced a website and DVD to complement the film.

17 Nov 2009

Archiving America: The Vitaphone, the DVD, and Warner Bros. (re)Store Jazz History

By | 2016-08-10T16:23:24+00:00 Tue, Nov 17, 2009|Dialogue, Digital Dialogues|

In 2007 Warner Bros. released the 80th anniversary DVD edition of The Jazz Singer, a boxed set that includes 34 conversion-era sound shorts and a 90-minute documentary about the Vitaphone and the birth of sound cinema. This collection is a tempered version of Warner's prior histories of the conversion that situate the studio squarely at

22 Apr 2008

Early Cinema as New Media

By | 2017-02-05T21:25:17+00:00 Tue, Apr 22, 2008|Dialogue, Digital Dialogues|

In this talk I will discuss early cinema as new media in the context of my recent book, Body Shots: Cinema's Incarnations, 1893-1904 (University of California Press, 2007). Body Shots puts the human body at the center of cinema's first decade of emergence, arguing for the complexity, richness, and sophistication of these moving corporeal representations