Digital Publishing

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9 Feb 2012

Emily Dickinson: Technology and Mythobiography

By | 2017-02-05T21:25:40+00:00 Thu, Feb 9, 2012|

This was a 2001 Faculty Fellowship project of Professor Carol Burbank from the Department of Theatre. Employing two different models of performative technology, a series of interactive templates for student experiments in writing, and a web collage or performance “fugue,” Dr. Burbank explored the way pastiche and narrative function within a technological frame.

9 Feb 2012

Ajax XML Encoder (AXE)

By | 2017-02-05T21:25:42+00:00 Thu, Feb 9, 2012|

AXE is a web-based tool for "tagging" text, video, audio, and image files with XML metadata, a process that is now a necessary but onerous first step in the production of digital material.

9 Feb 2012

Bill Bly Collection

By | 2015-12-14T20:26:55+00:00 Thu, Feb 9, 2012|

The Bill Bly Collection of Electronic Literature is a rich archive of materials from the early literary hypertext movement, received as a generous donation to MITH directly from Bill Bly.

7 Feb 2012

Early Americas Digital Archive

By | 2017-02-05T21:25:44+00:00 Tue, Feb 7, 2012|

The Early Americas Digital Archive (EADA) is a collection of electronic texts and links to texts originally written in or about the Americas from 1492 to approximately 1820. Open to the public for research and teaching purposes, EADA was published and supported by the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH) under the general editorship of Professor Ralph Bauer, at the University of Maryland at College Park.

7 Feb 2012

Text-Image Linking Environment

By | 2017-02-05T21:25:46+00:00 Tue, Feb 7, 2012|

The Text-Image Linking Environment (TILE) is a web-based tool for creating and editing image-based electronic editions and digital archives of humanities texts.

2 Feb 2012

Archimedes Palimpsest

By | 2015-12-14T20:22:54+00:00 Thu, Feb 2, 2012|

This thirteenth century prayer book contains erased texts that were written several centuries earlier, including two treatises by Archimedes that can be found nowhere else, The Method and Stomachion. MITH worked with the Walters Art Museum to develop an interactive interface for the detailed study of this manuscript.

10 Jan 2012

Shelley-Godwin Archive

By | 2017-04-18T11:20:10+00:00 Tue, Jan 10, 2012|

The Shelley-Godwin Archive draws primarily from the Bodleian Library, Oxford, and the Carl H. Pforzheimer Collection of Shelley and His Circle at New York Public Library (NYPL), which together hold an estimated 90 percent of all known relevant manuscripts worldwide. MITH is creating the project’s infrastructure with the assistance of the New York Public Library’s digital humanities group, NYPL Labs. With the Archive’s creation, manuscripts and early editions of these writers will be made freely available to the public through an innovative framework constituting a new model of best practice for research libraries.

6 Jan 2012

Shakespeare Quartos Archive

By | 2017-02-05T21:25:47+00:00 Fri, Jan 6, 2012|

The Shakespeare Quartos Archive is a digital collection of pre-1642 editions of William Shakespeare's plays. A cross-Atlantic collaboration has produced an interactive interface for the detailed study of these geographically distant quartos, with full functionality for all thirty-two quarto copies of Hamlet held by participating institutions.

10 Nov 2011

MITH Receives the Bill Bly Collection of Electronic Literature

By | 2017-02-05T21:15:00+00:00 Thu, Nov 10, 2011|Community, News|

COLLEGE PARK -- The Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH) has received a major collection of electronic literature and vintage computer hardware from pioneering hypertext author Bill Bly. Bly's generous donation includes a rich archive of materials from the early literary hypertext movement, and joins the existing Deena Larsen Collection also housed at

3 Nov 2009

The Great Ebook Throwdown

By | 2017-02-05T21:25:13+00:00 Tue, Nov 3, 2009|Dialogue, Digital Dialogues|

Ebooks are suddenly everywhere again. Kindle, Nook, iPhone . . . after 2000 years, the codex is getting an upgrade. But what kind of electronic books and electronic reading devices do we really want? Are we trying to improve on the book, or create something new? Something different? Are there some universal design principles we