Archives and Editions

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26 Oct 2016

Alberto Campagnolo Digital Dialogue

By | 2017-05-12T15:14:30+00:00 Wed, Oct 26, 2016|Dialogue, Digital Dialogues|

Books are primarily physical objects composed of leaves combined in sections, used as writing supports, and bound together. An increasing number of libraries, archives, and other memory institutions are investing considerable amount of money and resources in the digitization of cultural heritage; however, these efforts focus on the text, seldom covering also what material

12 Oct 2016

Gregory Zinman Digital Dialogue

By | 2017-05-12T14:48:25+00:00 Wed, Oct 12, 2016|Uncategorized|

This talk describes the discovery and significance of Etude (1967), a previously unknown work by media artist Nam June Paik identified by the author in the Smithsonian American Art Museum’s recently-acquired Paik archive. Composed at Bell Labs, in collaboration with engineers, and written in an early version of FORTRAN, Etude stands as one of the earliest works of digital art—although

20 Sep 2016

Purdom Lindblad Digital Dialogue

By | 2017-02-05T21:24:51+00:00 Tue, Sep 20, 2016|Dialogue, Digital Dialogues|

In the Republic of the Imagination, Azar Nafisi champions reading as a way to open ourselves to deepen empathy and entice our curiosity. Inspired, I am developing ways of documenting and visualizing not only what I read, but also what caused me to read using linked open data. Through a custom Jekyll plugin, RDFa triples

29 Feb 2016

The Shelley-Godwin Archive Releases the Prometheus Unbound fair copy notebooks

By | 2017-02-05T21:13:54+00:00 Mon, Feb 29, 2016|Research|

The Shelley-Godwin Archive is pleased to announce the public release of Percy Bysshe Shelley’s Prometheus Unbound fair copy notebooks, Bodleian MSS. Shelley e.1, e.2, and e.3. Beyond the fair copy of what is arguably Shelley’s greatest poem, these notebooks contain fair copies of his lyric poems “Ode to Heaven” and “Misery.—A Fragment,” as well as

23 Feb 2016

Maxim Romanov Digital Dialogue

By | 2016-03-08T20:56:51+00:00 Tue, Feb 23, 2016|Uncategorized|

In the course of 14 centuries, Muslim authors wrote, compiled and recompiled a great number of multivolume collections that often include tens of thousands of biographical, bibliographical and historical records. Over the past decade, many of these texts (predominantly in Arabic) have become available in full text format through a number of digital libraries. The

16 Feb 2016

Introducing Documenting the Now

By | 2017-02-05T21:13:54+00:00 Tue, Feb 16, 2016|News, Research|

A few weeks ago MITH announced that it will be partnering with Washington University in St Louis (WUSTL) and the University of California at Riverside (UCR) on a new project called Documenting the Now. Documenting the Now is aimed at accomplishing two different, but deeply interrelated goals. The first is to develop an open source

29 Jan 2016

African American History, Culture and Digital Humanities

By | 2017-02-05T21:25:29+00:00 Fri, Jan 29, 2016|

African American History, Culture and Digital Humanities (AADHum) was awarded to the College of Arts and Humanities (ARHU) and is being co-directed by MITH and the Arts and Humanities Center for Synergy (Center for Synergy). The project was funded by a $1.25 million grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation for research, education and training at the intersections of digital humanities and African American studies, and will help to prepare a diverse community of scholars and students whose work will both broaden the reach of the digital humanities in African American history and cultural studies, and enrich humanities research with new methods, archives and tools.

12 Nov 2015

Infinite Ulysses

By | 2017-02-05T21:25:30+00:00 Thu, Nov 12, 2015|

Infinite Ulysses was the 2014-15 Winnemore Digital Dissertation project of Amanda Visconti, who created a participatory digital edition of James Joyce's difficult but rewarding novel Ulysses. This project built on her master's thesis work at the University of Michigan School of Information, where she explored user testing for the digital humanities, and how digital archives and editions might be designed to include a public audience.

3 Nov 2015

Digital Feminisms: Transnational Activism in German Protest Cultures

By | 2017-02-05T21:25:31+00:00 Tue, Nov 3, 2015|

Digital Feminisms: Transnational Activism in German Protest Cultures was a fellowship project led by Hester Baer, the 2014-15 Vambery Distinguished Professor of Comparative Studies. Digital Feminisms examined the reconfigurations of feminist activism in the context of rapid technological change, analyzing how the increased use of digital media has altered, influenced, and shaped feminist politics in the twenty-first century.