African American Studies

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29 Jan 2016

African American History, Culture and Digital Humanities

By | 2017-02-05T21:25:29+00:00 Fri, Jan 29, 2016|

African American History, Culture and Digital Humanities (AADHum) was awarded to the College of Arts and Humanities (ARHU) and is being co-directed by MITH and the Arts and Humanities Center for Synergy (Center for Synergy). The project was funded by a $1.25 million grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation for research, education and training at the intersections of digital humanities and African American studies, and will help to prepare a diverse community of scholars and students whose work will both broaden the reach of the digital humanities in African American history and cultural studies, and enrich humanities research with new methods, archives and tools.

28 Jan 2016

Digital Humanities Incubator 2014–15: Researching Ferguson

By | 2017-02-05T21:25:30+00:00 Thu, Jan 28, 2016|

The 2014 – 2015 Digital Humanities Incubator, entitled “Researching Ferguson,” is a campus-wide initiative which aims to provide leadership and training on event-based social media data and network analysis. These workshops are part of the broader, university-wide effort to engage the #BlackLivesMatter movement at the University of Maryland.

16 Jul 2015

MITH partners in $1.25 Million Mellon Grant Awarded to UMD’s Arts and Humanities College

By | 2016-07-11T11:44:07+00:00 Thu, Jul 16, 2015|News, Research|

A $1.25 million grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation will fund research, education and training at the intersections of digital humanities and African American studies at the University of Maryland. The grant will help to prepare a diverse community of scholars and students whose work will both broaden the reach of the digital humanities

8 Jul 2015

Learning from Langston Terrace

By | 2015-12-19T01:31:34+00:00 Wed, Jul 8, 2015|

Langston Terrace is the nation's first public housing program built in Washington, D.C. Opened in 1937, Langston Terrace housed Black low-income, working class families; it was one of 51 racially segregated projects built by the Public Works Administration as part of the New Deal. In collaboration with Kelly Quinn from UMD's Department of American Studies, MITH staff assisted with the creation of a website, Learning from Langston Terrace, which sought to commemorate the history of the community by compiling and offering primary sources for visitors. The materials on the site were meant to augment user's experiences and memories of Langston and the scholarly literature.

2 Jul 2015

Electronic Skin: Community Building and Virtual Embodiment

By | 2017-02-05T21:25:33+00:00 Thu, Jul 2, 2015|

This was a project of Spring 2011 MITH Winnemore Digital Dissertation Fellow Maria Velazquez. Her dissertation, "Electronic Skin: Community Building and Virtual Embodiment" investigated the creative processes through which citizens are made, with particular attention to the role that technologies like blogging, virtual reality, and electronic activism foster the use of “imaginative embodiment” in creating stories of citizenship, selfhood, and action.

3 Jun 2015

Digital Diasporas

By | 2015-12-14T21:35:32+00:00 Wed, Jun 3, 2015|

Digital Diasporas was the first conference of its kind to bring together to discuss on-going projects and also debate the theoretical, methodological, and pedagogical issues raised by the intersection of the fields of Digital Humanities and African American/African Diaspora Studies.

1 May 2012

From Print to Digital: The Black Gotham Digital Archive

By | 2017-02-06T10:56:48+00:00 Tue, May 1, 2012|Community, Dialogue, Digital Dialogues, Events|

I’ve spent my MITH fellowship year working on “The Black Gotham Digital Archive.” My goal is to link an interactive web site, smart phones, and the geographic spaces of Lower Manhattan and Brooklyn to create a deeper understanding of nineteenth-century black New York. The project is an extension of my book, Black Gotham: A Family History

6 Mar 2012

Black Gotham Archive

By | 2016-01-29T16:53:15+00:00 Tue, Mar 6, 2012|

The Black Gotham Digital Archive links an interactive web site, smart phones, and the geographical spaces of Lower Manhattan and Brooklyn to create a deeper understanding of nineteenth-century black New York.

29 Sep 2009

The Harlem Renaissance in Second Life

By | 2016-08-09T11:36:18+00:00 Tue, Sep 29, 2009|Dialogue, Digital Dialogues|

This talk will address various aspects of teaching in Second Life. Drawing on their two-year experience co-teaching courses on the Harlem Renaissance that have brought together students from the University of Maryland, the University of Central Missouri, and the Sorbonne, Bryan Carter and Zita Nunes will discuss the pedagogical opportunities afforded "in-world."