African American Studies

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15 Feb 2017

André Brock Digital Dialogue

By | 2017-05-12T17:54:41+00:00 Wed, Feb 15, 2017|Uncategorized|

A heartrending recent development of digital practice is the dissemination on social networks of videos of state violence against Black men and women, such as the Facebook video of Philando Castile’s passing, or the YouTube video depicting the arrest and beating of Sandra Bland. In response, many Black folk have begun describing the effects

30 Jan 2017

Kishonna Gray Digital Dialogue

By | 2017-05-12T17:44:38+00:00 Mon, Jan 30, 2017|Digital Dialogues, Events|

As racial projects, video games legitimize white masculinity and hegemonic ideology through the ‘othering’ process. This is performed via pixelated minstrelsy by depicting Black and Brown bodies as objects to be destroyed and women as bodies to be dominated. The mediated story of Black characters is limited and situated within buffoonery (comedy) or crime

9 Nov 2016

Dana Williams and Kenton Rambsy Digital Dialogue

By | 2017-05-12T15:34:21+00:00 Wed, Nov 9, 2016|Dialogue, Digital Dialogues|

Patterns in literary scholarship suggest that serious considerations of a literary period do not fully begin until at least a generation after its emergence. Accordingly, meaningful scholarship on African American literature since 1970 is only now beginning to slowly emerge. Scholars interested in this period face two significant challenges. First, the sheer volume of

2 Nov 2016

Jim Casey and Sarah Patterson Digital Dialogue

By | 2017-05-12T15:27:09+00:00 Wed, Nov 2, 2016|Dialogue, Digital Dialogues|

Staking a claim in collaborative models of digital archiving, exhibition and geo-spatial visualization, Sarah Patterson and Jim Casey will introduce questions, concepts and outcomes central to the Colored Conventions Project's online restoration of the Colored Conventions Movement, 1830-1900. Working with literature and data connected to this understudied phenomenon in Black political organizing, Patterson and

19 Oct 2016

Ravon Ruffin Digital Dialogue

By | 2017-05-12T15:01:30+00:00 Wed, Oct 19, 2016|Dialogue, Digital Dialogues|

Could a Spotify playlist be considered an archive? How do hashtags challenge our finding aids of certain communities? Social and digital media tools and platforms have increasingly been utilized to advance community-centered approaches to archives, collections, and interpretation. These methods decolonize the archival practice and assert the presence of marginalized communities. This challenge comes

5 Jul 2016

Catherine Knight Steele Digital Dialogue

By | 2017-02-16T10:26:14+00:00 Tue, Jul 5, 2016|Dialogue, Digital Dialogues|

Online space often operates within an invisible white universe with blackness becoming apparent only insomuch as it is rendered deviant. In a post-Cosby and Obama era of perceived post-raciality, black people are left to exist purely within the “dominant social imagination as media constructed stars and fantasy figures.” Black characters in popular culture thrive

18 Feb 2016

Kim Gallon Digital Dialogue

By | 2016-01-27T19:27:50+00:00 Thu, Feb 18, 2016|Uncategorized|

In the recent past, black people have created and utilized a variety of digital spaces and media to reconfigure the terms and terrain of debates and discussions on what it means to be human. How do we as scholars, educators, librarians and archivists use specific cases and experiences to teach habits of critical thought and

16 Feb 2016

Introducing Documenting the Now

By | 2017-02-05T21:13:54+00:00 Tue, Feb 16, 2016|News, Research|

A few weeks ago MITH announced that it will be partnering with Washington University in St Louis (WUSTL) and the University of California at Riverside (UCR) on a new project called Documenting the Now. Documenting the Now is aimed at accomplishing two different, but deeply interrelated goals. The first is to develop an open source

29 Jan 2016

African American History, Culture and Digital Humanities

By | 2017-02-05T21:25:29+00:00 Fri, Jan 29, 2016|

African American History, Culture and Digital Humanities (AADHum) was awarded to the College of Arts and Humanities (ARHU) and is being co-directed by MITH and the Arts and Humanities Center for Synergy (Center for Synergy). The project was funded by a $1.25 million grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation for research, education and training at the intersections of digital humanities and African American studies, and will help to prepare a diverse community of scholars and students whose work will both broaden the reach of the digital humanities in African American history and cultural studies, and enrich humanities research with new methods, archives and tools.

28 Jan 2016

Digital Humanities Incubator 2014–15: Researching Ferguson

By | 2017-02-05T21:25:30+00:00 Thu, Jan 28, 2016|

The 2014 – 2015 Digital Humanities Incubator, entitled “Researching Ferguson,” is a campus-wide initiative which aims to provide leadership and training on event-based social media data and network analysis. These workshops are part of the broader, university-wide effort to engage the #BlackLivesMatter movement at the University of Maryland.