Endangered Data Week

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  • Endangered Data Week

Led by the Digital Library Federation, Endangered Data Week, April 17-21, is an international, collaborative effort, coordinated across campuses, nonprofits, libraries, citizen science initiatives, and cultural heritage institutions, to shed light on public datasets that are in danger of being deleted, repressed, mishandled, or lost. The goals of Endangered Data Week are to promote care for endangered collections by publicizing the availability of datasets; increasing critical engagement with them, including through visualization and analysis; and by encouraging political activism for open data policies and the fostering of data skills through workshops on curation, documentation and discovery, improved access, and preservation.

Partnering with University of Maryland Libraries, MITH hosted a roundtable to illuminate threats as well as ethical questions and best practices for working with endangered cultural heritage data. A hands-on workshop followed the panel, highlighting specific tools and approaches for preserving data.

Endangered Cultural Heritage Data Round Table

Tue, Apr 18, 2017
12:00 pm1:00 pm
MITH

Panelists:  Alberto Campagnolo (Library of Congress), Ricky Punzalan (iSchool), Mary Sies (American Studies), and Colleen Woods (History)

Moderator: Trevor Muñoz (MITH)

This round table focuses on what it means for cultural heritage data to be “endangered,” and how this intersects with ethical concerns and best practices. We are particularly interested in the forms of cultural data that are traditionally overlooked or under-represented in larger conversations around data preservation—such as music, oral histories, fragile books, etc.

 

Data Preservation Workshop

Thu, Apr 20, 2017
3:00 pm4:00 pm
McKelding Library, Room 6107

In hands-on workshop about digital preservation tools and techniques, David Durden and Joshua Westgard, together with Joseph Koivisto and colleagues from MITH and the iSchool, introduced participants to the key concepts and strategies for ensuring the integrity of digital assets, techniques that are equally useful for institutions and individuals who have important digital content to protect from loss.

2017| Topics: , , , | Partners: University of Maryland Libraries · Digital Library Federation|