October 3rd Digital Dialogue: Timothy Stinson, “Everything Old Is New Again: The Re-emergence of Medieval Polyvocality in Digital Manuscript Archives”

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A MITH Digital Dialogue

Tuesday, October 3, 12:30-1:45

MITH Conference Room, McKeldin Library B0135

“Everything Old Is New Again: The Re-emergence of Medieval Polyvocality in Digital Manuscript Archives”

by TIMOTHY STINSON (Johns Hopkins University)

This talk will explore the use of digital media to depict and account for medieval notions of authority, translation, and textual transmission, concepts that are often excluded from or distorted by print editions. Whereas print editions of medieval literary texts typically treat the presence of competing textual versions, authors, and manuscript witnesses as a problem to resolve, either by recreating a hypothetical authorial text or choosing the best extant text to represent an entire textual or narrative tradition, digital manuscript archives are increasingly fostering a re-emergence of the simultaneous presence of competing voices and authorial roles. Digital media are thus allowing us an opportunity to “get medieval” in our representations of texts in a manner unprecedented in the age of print. Examples will be drawn from my work on three manuscript archives–the Roman de la Rose Digital Surrogates Project, the Piers Plowman Electronic Archive, and the Siege of Jerusalem Electronic Archive. No familiarity with medieval texts or textual traditions will be assumed or necessary to follow or participate in this discussion!

Timothy Stinson earned his Ph.D. in English from the University of Virginia. His dissertation, entitled “The Siege of Jerusalem: An Electronic Archive and Hypertext Edition,” was an electronic archive of the nine surviving manuscripts witnesses of an anonymous fourteenth-century alliterative poem, and comprises editions of each of them linked to images of all extant manuscript leaves. He is currently a postdoctoral fellow at Johns Hopkins University, where he works on the Roman de la Rose Digital Surrogates Project.

Coming up @MITH Oct. 10: DANIEL PITTI (Institute for Advanced Technology in the Humanities, University of Virginia), “Social Software: Why Would I Want to Consult an Encyclopedia that Would Have Me as a Contributor?” View the complete Fall 2006 schedule for Digital Dialogues here: http://www.mith2.umd.edu/programs/mith_speakers_fall_2006.pdf

Free and open to the public.

Contact: Neil Fraistat, Director, MITH (www.mith.umd.edu, mith@umd.edu, 5-5896).

By | 2017-02-05T21:16:22+00:00 Thu, Sep 28, 2006|Digital Dialogues|