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Digital Archives: Radical Acts of Self-Preservation

Ravon Ruffin
Ravon Ruffin
Brown Girls Museum Blog
MITH Conference Room
Tuesday, October 25, 2016
12:30 pm

Could a Spotify playlist be considered an archive? How do hashtags challenge our finding aids of certain communities? Social and digital media tools and platforms have increasingly been utilized to advance community-centered approaches to archives, collections, and interpretation. These methods decolonize the archival practice and assert the presence of marginalized communities. This challenge comes

By | 2017-05-12T15:01:30+00:00 Wed, Oct 19, 2016|Dialogue, Digital Dialogues|

Nam June Paik’s Etude and the Indeterminate Origins of Digital Media Art

Gregory Zinman
Georgia Institute of Technology
MITH Conference Room
Tuesday, October 18, 2016
12:30 pm

This talk describes the discovery and significance of Etude (1967), a previously unknown work by media artist Nam June Paik identified by the author in the Smithsonian American Art Museum’s recently-acquired Paik archive. Composed at Bell Labs, in collaboration with engineers, and written in an early version of FORTRAN, Etude stands as one of the earliest works of digital art—although

By | 2017-05-12T14:48:25+00:00 Wed, Oct 12, 2016|Uncategorized|

Finding Aids for the Unread: Design for the Visualization of Reading

Purdom Lindblad
Purdom Lindblad
Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH)
MITH Conference Room
Tuesday, October 4, 2016
12:30 pm

In the Republic of the Imagination, Azar Nafisi champions reading as a way to open ourselves to deepen empathy and entice our curiosity. Inspired, I am developing ways of documenting and visualizing not only what I read, but also what caused me to read using linked open data. Through a custom Jekyll plugin, RDFa triples

By | 2017-02-05T21:24:51+00:00 Tue, Sep 20, 2016|Dialogue, Digital Dialogues|

Deviant Black Bodies and Embodied Black Feminism in the Blogosphere

Catherine Steele
Catherine Knight Steele
University of Maryland
MITH Conference Room
Tuesday, October 11, 2016
12:30 pm

Online space often operates within an invisible white universe with blackness becoming apparent only insomuch as it is rendered deviant. In a post-Cosby and Obama era of perceived post-raciality, black people are left to exist purely within the “dominant social imagination as media constructed stars and fantasy figures.” Black characters in popular culture thrive

By | 2017-02-16T10:26:14+00:00 Tue, Jul 5, 2016|Dialogue, Digital Dialogues|

Five Decades of Experiments with Hypermedia Systems for the Humanities

Andries van Dam
Brown University
MITH Conference Room
Tuesday, April 26, 2016
12:30 pm
Co-sponsored by the Human-Computer Interaction Lab (HCIL)

Since 1967, when my students and I, collaborating with Theodor Nelson, built the Hypertext Editing System on an IBM /360 mainframe, I’ve been involved with building a succession of hypermedia systems primarily but not exclusively for the humanities. I will begin this talk with a brief description of the history of this work at

By | 2017-03-27T18:19:47+00:00 Tue, Apr 12, 2016|Digital Dialogues|

Track Changes: A Literary History of Word Processing Book Launch

Matthew Kirschenbaum
Matthew Kirschenbaum
University of Maryland, College Park
Tawes Hall, Room 2115
Tuesday, April 12, 2016
12:30 pm
Co-Sponsored by the Department of English

This Digital Dialogue is also a launch event for Matthew Kirschenbaum's new book Track Changes: A Literary History of Word Processing, sponsored by the English department's Center for Literary and Comparative Studies. Neil Fraistat will be on hand to host, and discuss the book with Matt. Copies will be available! About the Book: The story of

By | 2016-04-22T21:21:10+00:00 Tue, Apr 5, 2016|Uncategorized|

Cultural Memory & Digital Mediation: Three contrasting projects in Armenia, Australia and South Africa

Harold Short
Harold Short
Australian Catholic University
MITH Conference Room
Tuesday, March 29, 2016
12:30 pm

This session will include presentations on projects in three very different cultural and social contexts. The purpose of the session is to prompt and facilitate discussion around issues that arise in using digital tools and techniques to support and preserve cultural memory. Each project is nationally important in its own context, but each may also be seen as a

By | 2017-02-05T21:24:52+00:00 Mon, Mar 21, 2016|Dialogue, Digital Dialogues, Events|

West Africa Historical GIS and the Liberated Africans Project

Henry Lovejoy
Henry Lovejoy
McMaster University and Michigan State University
MITH Conference Room
Tuesday, March 8, 2016
12:30 pm

Knowing when and where people came from within Africa, and when and where they went in diaspora, is a major research question affecting the history of the continent and the broader Atlantic world. My proposed solution is to initiate the process of creating the framework to standardize Africa’s geo-political history. Creating a broadly-accepted core

By | 2017-03-27T17:21:57+00:00 Tue, Mar 1, 2016|Uncategorized|

Of graphs, maps, and 30,000 Muslims: Digital Humanities & The Premodern Islamic World

Maxim Romanov
Maxim Romanov
University of Leipzig
MITH Conference Room
Tuesday, March 1, 2016
12:30 pm
Co-Sponsored by Roshan Institute for Persian Studies

In the course of 14 centuries, Muslim authors wrote, compiled and recompiled a great number of multivolume collections that often include tens of thousands of biographical, bibliographical and historical records. Over the past decade, many of these texts (predominantly in Arabic) have become available in full text format through a number of digital libraries. The

By | 2016-03-08T20:56:51+00:00 Tue, Feb 23, 2016|Uncategorized|

Black Digital Humanities Pedagogy and Praxis

Kim Gallon
Kim Gallon
Purdue University
MITH Conference Room
Tuesday, February 23, 2016
12:30 pm

In the recent past, black people have created and utilized a variety of digital spaces and media to reconfigure the terms and terrain of debates and discussions on what it means to be human. How do we as scholars, educators, librarians and archivists use specific cases and experiences to teach habits of critical thought and

By | 2016-01-27T19:27:50+00:00 Thu, Feb 18, 2016|Uncategorized|