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Large Scale Text Analysis in the Digital Humanities: Methods and Challenges

Aditi Muralidharan
Aditi Muralidharan
University of California, Berkeley
MITH Conference Room
Friday, September 2, 2011
12:30 pm

To tackle increasingly large digitized archives of text, the digital humanities community has responded with an avid interest in text mining and visualization. Everywhere one looks these days, computer scientists are bringing text analysis to humanities scholars with tutorials, workshops, and toolkits. Nevertheless, crucial information is being lost in translation. If text analysis toolkits are

By | 2016-07-13T11:03:29+00:00 Tue, Sep 20, 2011|Dialogue, Digital Dialogues|

The Googlization of Surveillance

Siva Vaidhyanathan
Siva Vaidhyanathan, Ph.D.
University of Virginia
MITH Conference Room
Tuesday, May 3, 2011
12:30 pm

Who is watching? Why should we worry? These questions, among others, are asked by SIVA VAIDHYANATHAN, Professor of Media Studies at the University of Virginia, in his recently published tome The Googlization of Everything — and Why We Should Worry. Using Google Street View as the prime example and case study, Dr. Vaidhyanathan explores the

By | 2016-08-08T16:02:38+00:00 Tue, May 3, 2011|Dialogue, Digital Dialogues|

Diggable Data, Scalable Reading, and New Humanities Scholarship

Seth Denbo
MITH
Neil Fraistat
MITH
MITH Conference Room
Tuesday, April 26, 2011
12:30 pm

In his 2005 book, Franco Moretti aims to open “a new front of discussion” by calling for a “distant reading” of texts in the pursuit of literary history. Abstraction in the form of the Graphs, Maps and Trees of the book’s title, he argues, reduces the number of elements in focus, providing a “sharper sense

By | 2017-02-05T21:25:11+00:00 Tue, Apr 26, 2011|Dialogue, Digital Dialogues|

Player Piano: Mechanizing the Humanities

James Smith
MITH, University of Maryland
MITH Conference Room
Tuesday, April 19, 2011
12:30 pm

Using music and imagery, James Smith considers what it means to compute the humanities. From recognizing faces to understanding music to reading text, the pace at which we experience media impacts how we understand it. The speed with which we compute determines how we interpret our computation, from simply pushing buttons to get a particular

By | 2017-02-05T21:25:11+00:00 Tue, Apr 19, 2011|Dialogue, Digital Dialogues|

Teaching Machines to Read Milton: Natural Language Processing Challenges for Literary and Historical Texts

Travis Brown
MITH, University of Maryland
MITH Conference Room
Tuesday, March 29, 2011
12:30 pm

Many popular natural language processing techniques and tools rely on annotated training corpora to learn models that can be used to process new data from a similar domain. We can train a parser on Wall Street Journal text from the Penn Treebank, for example, and expect it to perform reasonably well on recent blog posts

By | 2017-02-05T21:25:11+00:00 Tue, Mar 29, 2011|Dialogue, Digital Dialogues|

The International Amateur Scanning League, Unlocking the Federal Archives One Work at a Time

Thomas Gideon
MITH Conference Room
Tuesday, March 15, 2011
12:30 pm

The federal government has produced and continues to produce a staggering amount of material, most of which is released directly into the public domain. The policies and processes for providing broad access in the age of the internet are still catching up both to that volume and new technologies. Experiments in public-private partnerships have been

By | 2016-07-21T15:02:34+00:00 Tue, Mar 15, 2011|Dialogue, Digital Dialogues|

Playworlds: Rule Systems & Relational Art

Mary Flanagan
Mary Flanagan, Ph.D.
Dartmouth College
MITH Conference Room
Tuesday, March 8, 2011
12:30 pm

In this talk, Dr. Mary Flanagan presents games and artworks that function to create emergent values among both designers and players. Arguing that agency is a key concept to designing play systems, Flanagan explores games, values, and the conceptual concerns inherent in the rule systems that constitute contemporary play, especially focusing on the implications of

By | 2016-07-21T15:01:45+00:00 Tue, Mar 8, 2011|Dialogue, Digital Dialogues|

Stop Being Polite and Start Getting Real: Professional Education for Professional Humanists

Tim Carmody
Tim Carmody, Ph.D.
University of Pennsylvannia
MITH Conference Room
Tuesday, March 1, 2011
12:30 pm

We’ve generally done everything we can in the humanities to ignore that a PhD is a every bit as much a professional degree as a degree in law, medicine, educational administration, information science, or business. The irony is that explicit training in the professional tools employed by professors, would actually make PhDs who end up

By | 2016-07-21T15:00:55+00:00 Tue, Mar 1, 2011|Dialogue, Digital Dialogues|

Community, Cohesion, and Commitment: Developing and Deploying Open Source Tools in the UVa Online Library Environment

Julie Meloni
University of Virginia
MITH Conference Room
Tuesday, February 22, 2011
12:30 pm

The University of Virginia Library is a key partner in the collaborative project known as “Hydra”; the goal of the Hydra Project is to create a comprehensive set of open source repository workflow tools that allow librarians and scholars to manage describe, deliver, reuse and preserve digital information. U.Va.’s committment to the project includes the

By | 2016-07-21T15:00:14+00:00 Tue, Feb 22, 2011|Dialogue, Digital Dialogues|

The Time and Place for Space and Time: Interfaces to Distributed Cultural Heritage Collections

Trevor Owens
Office of Strategic Initiatives at the Library of Congress
MITH Conference Room
Tuesday, February 15, 2011
12:30 pm

Digital cultural heritage collections include temporal, locative, and categorical data which are increasingly enabling new interfaces to our cultural heritage. These kinds of dynamic interfaces are what end users are starting to expect of their interactions. Trevor Owens, digital archivist at the National Digital Information Infrastructure and Preservation Program (NDIIPP) in the Office of Strategic

By | 2017-02-05T21:25:12+00:00 Tue, Feb 15, 2011|Dialogue, Digital Dialogues|