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News related to MITH’s in-house, collaborative, or grant-funded research projects.

15 Dec 2011

BitCurator Team Convenes to Analyze Digital Forensics in Archival Workflows

By | 2017-02-05T21:14:58+00:00 Thu, Dec 15, 2011|News, Research|

This past weekend the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH) hosted a two-day workshop for BitCurator, a collaboration between UNC Chapel Hill's School of Information and Library Science (SILS) and MITH. BitCurator is an effort to build, test, and analyze systems and software for incorporating digital forensics methods into the workflows of a

21 Nov 2011

What’s the Virtue of Virtuality?

By | 2017-02-05T21:14:58+00:00 Mon, Nov 21, 2011|Faculty Fellows, Research|

As is generally the case with things intellectual, progress on my digital archive has been quite slow. I have several "handlers" (as I call them) at MITH and they are all terrific. Kirsten Keister is responsible for the design of this website which I think is truly elegant—and she did it in record time. Emma

17 Nov 2011

Progress Involves Some Undoing

By | 2017-02-05T21:14:59+00:00 Thu, Nov 17, 2011|Faculty Fellows, Research|

Thanks to the input of Travis Brown, Assistant Director at MITH and the programmer working on this project, I am now revisiting the organization of the project and its constituent files. We are now working with a central text, that will be pre-tokenized [broken into discrete and uniquely identified units by word] to which all

8 Nov 2011

Confessions

By | 2017-02-05T21:15:01+00:00 Tue, Nov 8, 2011|Faculty Fellows, Research|

As a professor in the humanities, I've spent a career committed to scholarly research. But I confess to having definite likes and dislikes. Here's what I like: going to the archives and rooting around looking at old documents, admiring early print fonts and deciphering barely legible handwriting; finding little scraps of paper with gold mines

27 Oct 2011

Videogames as Objects of Cultural Preservation

By | 2017-02-05T21:15:04+00:00 Thu, Oct 27, 2011|Research|

I've had the good fortune of being the graduate assistant for the Preserving Virtual Worlds (PVW) project for *mumble* years. The project is a partnership between MITH, The University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), Stanford University, and the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT). In the first phase (2008-2010) we focused on fairly practical matters: getting videogame

20 Oct 2011

MITH Partners with UNC SILS on Digital Forensics Project

By | 2017-02-05T21:15:07+00:00 Thu, Oct 20, 2011|Community, News, Research|

CHAPEL HILL - The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's School of Information and Library Science (SILS) has received a grant for $600,000 from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation for a project that creates and analyzes systems for archivists, librarians and other information professionals to incorporate digital forensics methods. The BitCurator project will be

19 Oct 2011

Starting Out

By | 2017-02-05T21:15:07+00:00 Wed, Oct 19, 2011|Faculty Fellows, Research|

This blog describes my progress on a born-digital critical edition of the Mishnah. For the various audiences who might read this, let me break out the terms and discuss them further. Born-digital: An edition that uses or develops technology to record, store, present, search, analyze, and study textual material, rather than a static presentation of

18 Oct 2011

Diggable Data, Scalable Reading, and New Humanities Scholarship

By | 2011-10-18T08:59:05+00:00 Tue, Oct 18, 2011|Community, Research|

Later this week I will be attending the 2nd International Culture and Computing Conference at the University of Kyoto and presenting the paper "Diggable Data, Scalable Reading, and New Humanities Scholarship." Digital Humanities is rapidly gaining a foothold in Japanese academic scholarship, and this conference features a strand devoted to new methodologies, ideas and outcomes that arise from

19 Aug 2011

Reading the Topic Modeling Literature

By | 2011-08-19T13:40:19+00:00 Fri, Aug 19, 2011|Community, Research|

As Sayan Bhattacharyya and I have discussed in several posts over the summer, the technique of unsupervised “topic modeling” or Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) has emerged in the humanities as one way to engage a text in “distant reading”. The appeal of the technique lies chiefly in the minimal assumptions it makes about the structure

8 Aug 2011

Reflections on Scale and Topic Modeling

By | 2017-02-05T21:15:19+00:00 Mon, Aug 8, 2011|Community, Research|

I recently came across a 1991 interview of the literary critic Harold Bloom (Sterling Professor of Humanities at Yale University) in The Paris Review, in the course of which Bloom remarks: "As far as I’m concerned, computers have as much to do with literature as space travel, perhaps much less." Since coming here (to MITH)