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Podcast: Between the Document and the Digital Map: The Need for the Archive and GIS to Analyze the Nazi Built Environment

Paul-Jaskot Paul Jaskot, Professor, History of Art and ArchitectureDePaul University@PBJaskot
Collaboratory for Visual CultureMonday, March 30, 201512:30 pmCo-sponsored by the Art History & Archaeology Department

Please note that this Digital Dialogue is a special co-sponsored talk in conjunction the Art History & Archaeology Department, and occurs on a different weekday and location.

The Michelle Smith Collaboratory for Visual Culture is located in Room 4213 of the Art and Sociology Building.  Click here for a map.

The Central Building Office at Auschwitz was for its time one of the largest architectural offices in Europe with over 150 SS architects and engineers employed as well as an equal number of forced-labor draftsmen. It was these architects who literally built the infrastructure of imperialist expansion in the East, as well was the brutal complementary structures of the Jewish genocide.

This talk analyzes the documentary evidence of the imperial ambitions of the SS as well as the digital visualizations of that archival evidence. Building off of his current work on digitally mapping the site (with his co-author, Anne Kelly Knowles), Jaskot asks what is at stake for digital mapping in the humanities, as well as for a spatial and architectural understanding of the Holocaust.

 

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Podcast: Performing the Digital Edition: Textual Scholarship and the Digital Consumption of Music Scores

Raffaele-Viglianti Raffaele Viglianti, Research ProgrammerMaryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities@raffazizzi
MITH Conference RoomTuesday, March 24, 201512:30 pm

What is the future of sheet music? The flexibility of the digital medium, as opposed to the rigidity of the printed form, calls for a more modern concept of the music score.

Even digital sheet music, in most cases, is designed to be printed; it is either produced with typesetting software, or made of images scanned from a printed source. This type of digital score exists in digital form almost exclusively for distribution. The difference between print and digital distribution is access: scores can be downloaded and printed at home.

Digital consumption, on the other hand, entails reading and performing the score directly from its digital manifestation. Small businesses are already investing in technologies to make the score follow the performer while playing, to support writing and displaying annotations by the performer, a teacher, other peers, etc.

In this talk, I’ll address the current status of digital sheet music publication and ask: can the digital consumption of a changeable, customizable publication influence a performer’s advocacy of a work? Textual scholarship and the preparation of critical editions is a fundamental component of this discussion, where I’ll convey editorial transparency as a vital function of digital consumption. . . . Continue Reading

Come read with us!: an update on the Infinite Ulysses participatory digital edition

Since my last post in January, I’ve used feedback from generous beta-testers to bring the Infinite Ulysses participatory digital edition up to where I’d hoped it would be by the end of my dissertation. In the past, I invited users in small batches from a list of readers who signed up to beta-test. I wanted to continue testing early and often, slowly ramping up the formality of my testing from the informal conversations I used during the previous year to formal survey metrics.

Private beta ends, public beta opens

As of last week, I’ve soft-launched an open beta of the site, and I’m now publicly inviting everyone to come give the site a try. Interested readers can now create a site account for themselves and immediately begin using all the site’s features without needing to wait for an email invitation.

Now that I’m wrapping up the site work that’s in scope for completing the dissertation, I’ve shifted from full-time design and development to writing a whitepaper report on the project.

This piece will pull together all the pieces that exist beyond the InfiniteUlysses.com site—things like a literature review for precedents to my project, user study results and analysis, and a return to my original research questions with what the project has helped me learn. . . . Continue Reading

MITH developer Ed Summers named recipient of the 2015 Kilgour Award

MITH is delighted to announce that our Lead Developer, Ed Summers, was recently named the 2015 recipient of the Kilgour Award. The Kilgour is jointly awarded by the The Library & Information Technology Association (LITA), a division of the American Library Association (ALA), and the OCLC, for “research relevant to the development of information technologies, especially work which shows promise of having a positive and substantive impact on any aspect(s) of the publication, storage, retrieval and dissemination of information, or the processes by which information and data is manipulated and managed.” The award will be presented to Ed at the ALA Annual Conference in San Francisco in June 2015, and also includes a cash prize and citation.

Please join us in congratulating Ed on his success! You can read the entire press release on the ALA website here.

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Podcast: Head-and-Shoulder Hunting in the Americas: Exploring Lobotomy's Visual Culture

miriam-posner Miriam Posner, Program Coordinator, Digital HumanitiesUniversity of California, Los Angeles@miriamkp
MITH Conference RoomTuesday, March 10, 201512:30 pm

Walter Freeman, the world’s foremost proponent and practitioner of lobotomy, was also an obsessive photographer. He almost invariably took photos of his patients before and after surgery, often tracking them down years after the operation to capture their images. These cross-country trips to photograph patients, which Freeman called head-and-shoulder hunting expeditions, consumed the physician during the last years of his career.

What do we do with an archive like this? Its contents can tell us volumes about the medical epistemology that made lobotomy thinkable. But how can we avoid replicating Freeman’s own rhetorical moves, in which the photographs were mobilized as evidence during scientific presentations?

I’ll describe the visual rhetoric that defined the scientific moment from which lobotomy emerged, and demonstrate some digital methods I’ve used for placing them in context. Against the background of this history, I ask, what is the contemporary digital scholar’s responsibility for working with, writing about, and displaying images of human beings in distress?

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Event: Researching Ferguson Session IV

Digital Humanities Incubator 2014–15: Researching Ferguson—Teach-ins for #blacklivesmatter at #umd

Session IV: Basic Navigation and Analysis of Your Data

Instructors: Ed Summers (MITH), Josh Westgard (Libraries)

Please note that the time and location of this workshop has changed from previous workshops. The workshop will be from 12:30pm to 2:00pm, and will be held in media classroom 0302H just across from MITH in the Library Media Services area of the Hornbake Library.

As part of the Digital Humanities Incubator 2014-2015 workshop series, MITH will be hosting five teach-ins exploring the collection, preservation, and analysis of social media. The focus throughout the series will be a collection of tweets harvested by MITH in August 2014 in the wake of the events in Ferguson, MO. These workshops are also part of the broader, university-wide effort to engage the #BlackLivesMatter movement at the University of Maryland.

Now that you have collected your Twitter data, how do you use it to help answer your research questions? This workshop will help you do that by describing the anatomy of a Tweet, the mechanics of JSON data, and how to write a simple program to process the data. . . . Continue Reading

Event: Researching Ferguson Session V

Digital Humanities Incubator 2014–15: Researching Ferguson—Teach-ins for #blacklivesmatter at #umd

Session V: Advanced Analytical Techniques

Instructors: Cody Buntain (Computer Science), Nick Diakopoulos (Journalism), Jen Golbeck (Information Studies), Ben Shneiderman (Computer Science)

As part of the Digital Humanities Incubator 2014-2015 workshop series, MITH will be hosting five teach-ins exploring the collection, preservation, and analysis of social media. The focus throughout the series will be a collection of tweets harvested by MITH in August 2014 in the wake of the events in Ferguson, MO. These workshops are also part of the broader, university-wide effort to engage the #BlackLivesMatter movement at the University of Maryland.

This conclusion to the “Researching Ferguson” teach-in series will focus on analytics for discovering insights from social media. Building on the previous sessions, we will demonstrate how temporal, network, sentiment, and geographic analyses on a subset of the Ferguson Twitter can aid understanding and enhance storytelling of a controversial event. These demonstrations will include hands-on exercises on categorizing tweets by location (from inside/outside Ferguson, MO) and sentiment (positive or negative language), visualizing the different groups of people taking part in the discussion, and detecting compelling moments in the data. . . . Continue Reading

Podcast: Kill Time, Make History: Building Inspector and other HCI Case Studies from NYPL Labs

mauricio-giraldo Mauricio Giraldo, Interaction Designer/DeveloperNYPL Labs@mgiraldo
MITH Conference RoomTuesday, March 3, 201512:30 pm

I’m currently an interaction designer at NYPL Labs, The New York Public Library’s digital innovation unit. One of our latest projects is Building Inspector, a tool to extract data from historic insurance atlases through a combination of computational (vectorization, computer vision, alpha shapes) and human (crowdsourcing, game design concepts) processes. This talk will provide an insight into the Building Inspector and other projects developed by NYPL Labs, with an emphasis on design and HCI-related challenges. For instance: how does one design tools that anyone can use regardless of prior knowledge, to validate computer-generated geographic data or to create stereographic images from 100-year-old photographs?

 

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Open Call for Applications: “Engaging the Public: Best Practices for Crowdsourcing Across the Disciplines”

We are pleased to issue an open call for applications to “Engaging the Public: Best Practices for Crowdsourcing Across the Disciplines.” This workshop, to be held at the University of Maryland in College Park, MD, on May 6-8, 2015, is being led by Dartmouth College and the University of Maryland, with the support of the National Endowment of the Humanities, the Institute for Museum and Library Services, and the Sloan Foundation.

The aim of the workshop is to culminate and then broaden the conversations from a series of regional meetings and webinars taking place through the auspices of Dartmouth’s 2014-15 IMLS-funded National Forum in Crowdsourcing for Libraries and Archives: Creating a Crowdsourcing Consortium (CCLA), to help advance a truly cross-disciplinary agenda (visit the CCLA website to learn more). A capstone for this process, our 2 ½ day event will bring together 50 scholars and practitioners from several disciplines, spanning the humanities, sciences, and social sciences, as well as representatives from 10 funding agencies.

Through a mix of formal and informal presentations combined with facilitated breakout sessions, we will focus on questions concerning how researchers and institutions might best leverage crowdsourcing strategies for increasing public engagement, integrating data into existing collections, and improving knowledge production in a variety of domains. . . . Continue Reading

Event: Researching Ferguson Session III

Digital Humanities Incubator 2014–15: Researching Ferguson—Teach-ins for #blacklivesmatter at #umd

PLEASE NOTE: This event has been postponed due to the closure of the University of Maryland campus on Thursday March 5th. We are working with instructors on determining a date later in the semester to reschedule, and will update this list once a new date is determined.

Session III: Ethics, Rights, Data Management

Instructors: Katie Shilton (iSchool), Ricky Punzalan (iSchool), Trevor Munoz (MITH) 

As part of the Digital Humanities Incubator 2014-2015 workshop series, MITH will be hosting five teach-ins exploring the collection, preservation, and analysis of social media. The focus throughout the series will be a collection of tweets harvested by MITH in August 2014 in the wake of the events in Ferguson, MO. These workshops are also part of the broader, university-wide effort to engage the #BlackLivesMatter movement at the University of Maryland.

This third workshop in the Digital Humanities Incubator 2014-2015 series will explore ethical concerns, public memory, and data management strategies for research with the Ferguson Twitter dataset.

A specific research question might be the impetus to collect social media data but, as soon as data collection begins, a variety of new challenges arise: what are the restrictions on how data might be used or published? . . . Continue Reading