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Event: Researching Ferguson Session IV

Digital Humanities Incubator 2014–15: Researching Ferguson—Teach-ins for #blacklivesmatter at #umd

Session IV: Basic Navigation and Analysis of Your Data

Instructors: Ed Summers (MITH), Josh Westgard (Libraries)

As part of the Digital Humanities Incubator 2014-2015 workshop series, MITH will be hosting five teach-ins exploring the collection, preservation, and analysis of social media. The focus throughout the series will be a collection of tweets harvested by MITH in August 2014 in the wake of the events in Ferguson, MO. These workshops are also part of the broader, university-wide effort to engage the #BlackLivesMatter movement at the University of Maryland.

Session IV will cover:

  • Metadata: What is in a Tweet?
  • Tools, Methods, Software for Working with JSON data
  • Includes hands on demonstration of tools

Please RSVP at http://ter.ps/dhinc4.

Future Researching Ferguson Teach-ins

Session V: Advanced Analytical Techniques (04/09)
•    Network Analysis
•    Sentiment Analysis
•    Event Detection

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Event: Researching Ferguson Session V

Digital Humanities Incubator 2014–15: Researching Ferguson—Teach-ins for #blacklivesmatter at #umd

Session V: Advanced Analytical Techniques

Instructors: Cody Buntain (Computer Science), Nick Diakopoulos (Journalism), Jen Golbeck (Information Studies), Ben Shneiderman (Computer Science)

As part of the Digital Humanities Incubator 2014-2015 workshop series, MITH will be hosting five teach-ins exploring the collection, preservation, and analysis of social media. The focus throughout the series will be a collection of tweets harvested by MITH in August 2014 in the wake of the events in Ferguson, MO. These workshops are also part of the broader, university-wide effort to engage the #BlackLivesMatter movement at the University of Maryland.

This conclusion to the “Researching Ferguson” teach-in series will focus on analytics for discovering insights from social media. Building on the previous sessions, we will demonstrate how temporal, network, sentiment, and geographic analyses on a subset of the Ferguson Twitter can aid understanding and enhance storytelling of a controversial event. These demonstrations will include hands-on exercises on categorizing tweets by location (from inside/outside Ferguson, MO) and sentiment (positive or negative language), visualizing the different groups of people taking part in the discussion, and detecting compelling moments in the data. . . . Continue Reading

Podcast: Kill Time, Make History: Building Inspector and other HCI Case Studies from NYPL Labs

mauricio-giraldo Mauricio Giraldo, Interaction Designer/DeveloperNYPL Labs@mgiraldo
MITH Conference RoomTuesday, March 3, 201512:30 pm

I’m currently an interaction designer at NYPL Labs, The New York Public Library’s digital innovation unit. One of our latest projects is Building Inspector, a tool to extract data from historic insurance atlases through a combination of computational (vectorization, computer vision, alpha shapes) and human (crowdsourcing, game design concepts) processes. This talk will provide an insight into the Building Inspector and other projects developed by NYPL Labs, with an emphasis on design and HCI-related challenges. For instance: how does one design tools that anyone can use regardless of prior knowledge, to validate computer-generated geographic data or to create stereographic images from 100-year-old photographs?

 

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Open Call for Applications: “Engaging the Public: Best Practices for Crowdsourcing Across the Disciplines”

We are pleased to issue an open call for applications to “Engaging the Public: Best Practices for Crowdsourcing Across the Disciplines.” This workshop, to be held at the University of Maryland in College Park, MD, on May 6-8, 2015, is being led by Dartmouth College and the University of Maryland, with the support of the National Endowment of the Humanities, the Institute for Museum and Library Services, and the Sloan Foundation.

The aim of the workshop is to culminate and then broaden the conversations from a series of regional meetings and webinars taking place through the auspices of Dartmouth’s 2014-15 IMLS-funded National Forum in Crowdsourcing for Libraries and Archives: Creating a Crowdsourcing Consortium (CCLA), to help advance a truly cross-disciplinary agenda (visit the CCLA website to learn more). A capstone for this process, our 2 ½ day event will bring together 50 scholars and practitioners from several disciplines, spanning the humanities, sciences, and social sciences, as well as representatives from 10 funding agencies.

Through a mix of formal and informal presentations combined with facilitated breakout sessions, we will focus on questions concerning how researchers and institutions might best leverage crowdsourcing strategies for increasing public engagement, integrating data into existing collections, and improving knowledge production in a variety of domains. . . . Continue Reading

Event: Researching Ferguson Session III

Digital Humanities Incubator 2014–15: Researching Ferguson—Teach-ins for #blacklivesmatter at #umd

Session III: Ethics, Rights, Data Management

Instructors: Katie Shilton (iSchool), Ricky Punzalan (iSchool), Trevor Munoz (MITH) 

As part of the Digital Humanities Incubator 2014-2015 workshop series, MITH will be hosting five teach-ins exploring the collection, preservation, and analysis of social media. The focus throughout the series will be a collection of tweets harvested by MITH in August 2014 in the wake of the events in Ferguson, MO. These workshops are also part of the broader, university-wide effort to engage the #BlackLivesMatter movement at the University of Maryland.

This third workshop in the Digital Humanities Incubator 2014-2015 series will explore ethical concerns, public memory, and data management strategies for research with the Ferguson Twitter dataset.

A specific research question might be the impetus to collect social media data but, as soon as data collection begins, a variety of new challenges arise: what are the restrictions on how data might be used or published? who else can data be shared with? is the collected data a fair representation of the subject? what’s the best way to keep this data available and usable? These questions are especially vital when social media data is being used to study social justice issues. . . . Continue Reading

Event: Researching Ferguson Session II

Digital Humanities Incubator 2014–15: Researching Ferguson—Teach-ins for #blacklivesmatter at #umd

Session II: Methods and Tools for Building Collections of Social Media

Instructors: Ed Summers (MITH), Porter Olsen (MITH), Laura Wrubel (GWU)

As part of the Digital Humanities Incubator 2014-2015 workshop series, MITH will be hosting five teach-ins exploring the collection, preservation, and analysis of social media. The focus throughout the series will be a collection of tweets harvested by MITH in August 2014 in the wake of the events in Ferguson, MO. These workshops are also part of the broader, university-wide effort to engage the #BlackLivesMatter movement at the University of Maryland.

In this 90 minute workshop we will introduce and lead a hands on demonstration of tools for collecting data from Twitter, such as the Ferguson collection mentioned above. We will briefly discuss the types of considerations that go into deciding what tools or services to use. The majority of the time will be spent creating your own collections of data using one of four tools: TAGS, IFTTT, Social Feed Manager and twarc.

This is a hands on workshop, so please bring a laptop and ideas about the Twitter data you would like to collect. . . . Continue Reading

Sign up now to have lunch with our Digital Dialogue speakers!

With our Digital Dialogue speaker series, MITH aims to foster community by extending an open offer to interested graduate students, staff, and faculty to request one of a limited number of spots to join our speakers for lunch. This is a great opportunity to engage directly with the speakers and discuss their work in a less formal setting. Our Spring 2015 season starts up with Shannon Mattern on February 24, and space is limited, so please fill out this form as soon as possible with your information and speaker preferences.

Requests will be accepted on a rolling basis, but are first come, first served.  Any questions can be sent to Stephanie Sapienza at sapienza@umd.edu.

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Mark your calendars … MITH’s Spring 2015 Digital Dialogues are coming up!

digital_dialogues_icon

MITH is excited to announce the lineup of speakers for our Spring 2015 Digital Dialogues season!  Our six speakers come from a wide variety of research specialties ranging from ranging from Digital Musicology to Literature/Digital Editions to Urban Media Art and Interaction Design. Reserve the date now for:

Tuesday February 24, 2015: Shannon Mattern

Tuesday March 3, 2015: Mauricio Giraldo

Tuesday March 10, 2015: Miriam Posner

Tuesday March 24, 2015: Raffaele Viglianti

Monday March 30, 2015:  Paul Jaskot

Tuesday April 7, 2015: Amanda Visconti

All talks are at 12:30 pm in the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities Conference Room, 0301 Hornbake Library, EXCEPT for the talk on Monday March 30th with Paul Jaskot, which will be held at the Michelle Smith Collaboratory for Visual Culture. All talks are open to the public. Talk titles and abstracts will be forthcoming. Speakers will be listed on the Digital Dialogues schedule here, which will be updated with more information about each talk as it becomes available.

Digital Dialogues is MITH’s signature events program, held almost every week while the academic semester is in session. . . . Continue Reading

Podcast: Strata of Sentience: Deep Mapping the Media City

shannon-mattern Shannon Mattern, Associate Professor of Media StudiesThe New School@shannonmattern
MITH Conference RoomTuesday, February 24, 201512:30 pm

While “smart” cities and urban “sentience” seem to be products of new networked technologies, our cities have actually been mediated, and intelligent, for millennia. They’ve long been shaped by their roles as substrates for and containers of mediation, and they’ve long reflected the logics, politics, and aesthetics of their prevailing communications technologies. I advocate for an “urban media archaeology,” a materialist, multisensory approach to exploring the deep material history – that is, a cultural materialist history that acknowledges the physicality, the “stuff” of history and culture – of our media cities. This talk offers a preview of Deep Mapping the Media City, a book forthcoming (in March 2015) from the University of Minnesota Press’s Forerunners series, in which I investigate our material urban spaces as infrastructures for mediation, and I propose that archaeological tools, like excavation and mapping, might help us to acknowledge and understand our smart, mediated cities in the longue durée.

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A Look at #FergusonSyllabus

As a new semester is about to begin academics are busily putting finishing touches on their course syllabi. Here at the University of Maryland there has been sustained interest over the past few months in integrating discussion and thinking about the recent events in Ferguson, and subsequent #BlackLivesMatter movement into our classes. Look for news about planned teach-ins and events like ours in the coming weeks.

If you are interested in finding Ferguson and #BlackLivesMatter resources to use in your coursework one place to look is the #FergusonSyllabus hashtag on Twitter. Marcia Chatelain, a history professor at Georgetown University and a University of Missouri–Columbia alumna, started this hashtag with this tweet back in August of 2014:

You can listen to an interview with Chatelain from Saint-Louis Public Radio soon conducted just a few days after this tweet. Since then there have been over 8,000 tweets with the #FergusonSyllabus hashtag. Chatelain wrote a post about her favorite suggested resources, and you can find other lists, such as this Google Doc from Daniel Krutka, a Professor of Education at Texas Woman’s University. . . . Continue Reading