10/19 MITH Digital Dialogue: Wayne Graham (UVA) and Joe Gilbert (UVA), “A Humanist’s Introduction to Programming (with Ruby)”

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A MITH Digital Dialogue
Tuesday, October 19, 12:30-1:45
MITH Conference Room, McKeldin Library B0135

“A Humanist’s Introduction to Programming (with Ruby)” by WAYNE GRAHAM and JOE GILBERT

At the University of Virginia Library’s Scholars’ Lab, Wayne Graham and Joe Gilbert regularly offer “A Humanist’s Introduction to Programming (with Ruby),” a short series of workshops geared toward humanities and social science scholars and intended to introduce basic programming concepts with the Ruby scripting language. Graham and Gilbert will reflect on reasons for teaching Ruby to humanists, will discuss the process of introducing programming to scholars with varying levels of technological ability, and will offer a sample of their leadoff workshop.

JOE GILBERT is the Head of the Scholars’ Lab at the University of Virginia Library. He consults with teaching faculty and graduate students on digital projects, manages public service in the lab, and contributes to web design and development efforts. He also coordinates various outreach events and the Scholars’ Lab’s exciting Graduate Fellowship in Digital Humanities program. He holds a bachelor’s degree in English and Computer Science from Vanderbilt University and a master’s degree in English from UVa.

WAYNE GRAHAM leads R&D efforts at the Scholars’ Lab at the University of Virginia Library, which allows teaming with faculty members to imagine new ways of approaching not only the collection of data, but also the interpretation and dissemination of the scholarly apparatus. Most recently, he has aimed development efforts on developing an extensible, opensource infrastructure to support geospatial scholarship in the humanities. He holds a bachelor’s degree in History from the Virginia Military Institute and a master’s degree in Colonial History from the College of William and Mary. His research interests include computer graphics, interpretive uses of augmented reality, vernacular architectural history, and the social interactions of the early Virginia frontier.

View MITH’s complete Fall Speakers Schedule here:

http://web.archive.org/web/20111121205902/http://mith.umd.edu/programs/mith_speakers_fall_2010.pdf

All talks free and open to the public!

Contact: Neil Fraistat, Director, MITH (http://mith.umd.edu, mith@umd.edu, 5-8927).

By | 2010-10-14T10:00:37+00:00 Thu, Oct 14, 2010|Community, Digital Dialogues|

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